Nothing Is As Easy Or Difficult As A Management Job

By | September 22, 2014

Submitted by: Sanjay Rawat

Looking for management jobs but not sure what are management jobs? Let us find out. Management jobs are those that are taken by people, who have many years of work experience or the education in a particular field be it, Sales, Marketing, Finance, Risk, Business, Human Resources, etc.

Although management jobs are prestigious they come with bigger responsibilities and a lot of pressure but they do also bring in a huge pay package. Getting into a management job is not as easy as it may sound because you must have some extraordinary management skills combined with personal qualities.

Be it a Multinational company or a small establishment, the success of it depends on the people who are sitting at the management level. An individual at a management level post is appraised on the basis of loses and profits he/she brings to the business and must be prepared to be fired or dismissed from duties if the company incurs major loses.

Whichever part of the world you go to the role of a person with a management level job has the same responsibilities; be it UK, US, China, Dubai, Canada, or even the Middle Eastern countries.

Job responsibilities of an individual in any management post:

1.Responsible for implementing and managing new process integration across all departments.

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2.Responsible of creating new business plans to bring in profits to the company.

3.Responsible of involving and engaging company stakeholders for every move the company makes.

4.Responsible of budgeting for newer projects.

5.Responsible of monitoring every department or department head if they are meeting deadlines and adhering to risk management.

6.Responsible of reporting to the board of directors or committee members.

7.Responsible of organizing meetings with other businesses in cases of acquisitions and partnership with other companies.

8.Responsible of business continuity in emergency situations

9.Responsible for maintaining documentation and aware of projects, departments, finances, etc.

10.Responsible of looking after the interest of the company and its employees.

11.Responsible of resolving business and department conflicts.

12.Responsible of motivating people under them.

13.Responsible of building employee and information networks to know how the market and company is doing.

14.Responsible of negotiating during business deals.

This is just a small list of what management people do. Also, it s not necessary that they might be performing all the above tasks; some may perform different tasks with a combination of few of the above tasks.

This is why it s important for managers or individuals looking for management level jobs to have the right kind of experience and qualification.Although management jobs aren t easy there are still very less management jobs in the market because usually people at management levels don t leave their jobs easily or quickly due to the money they earn and position they are in.

In closing, if you are given a management position job grab it and hold onto it until it s time to leave (preferably retirement) because responsibilities and pressure maybe too much for you to handle but job satisfaction and monetary benefits are very appealing here.

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England’s elderly face human rights breaches in home care system

By | September 19, 2014

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 

A report published today by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) finds that, in many cases, England’s home care system breaches the human rights of the elderly it is supposed to serve. The Close to home: older people and human rights in home care report is the result of a twelve-month investigation into care generally provided by local authorities.

Approximately half of those receiving home care, plus friends and family, providing evidence to the inquiry were satisfied with the quality of care provided. However, the report stresses that there are “systemic problems” arising from “a failure to apply a human rights approach to home care provision”. The report asserts that it is generally not the fault of individuals providing care, but serious problems exist as local authorities seem unaware of their obligations under the Human Rights Act and fail to commission, procure, and monitor care accordingly.

The report says articles two, three and eight of the European Convention on Human Rights are frequently being breached. These, respectively, cover an individual’s right to life, protection from inhumane and degrading treatment, and respect for dignity and personal independence. Criticisms include that care is not provided in a common-sense manner, and funding of care for the elderly is at lower levels than for younger people with similar problems and needs.

The EHRC’s investigation highlights a range of recurring complaints and attempts to identify the underlying causes; cost is repeatedly mentioned, with use of the private-sector leading to some local authorities offering a “one size fits all” service leaving many elderly feeling they are “a task to be undertaken” and have “little or no choice” as to help received, or when care workers visit. A failure to invest in care workers is noted, with significant responsibility and the wide range of skills required being rewarded with low pay and status; this, the report states, adversely impacts staff retention and, a high turnover of care workers can put the security of care recipients at-risk.

Within the wider investigation, a commissioned independent social report by The Arndale Centre conducted in-depth interviews with a cross-section of 40 elderly individuals receiving home care. As-stressed in the report, those selected were not on the basis of good, or bad, experiences with their – mainly local authority-provided – care. It highlights a widespread feeling amongst those interviewed that they are treated “like a number”, and that aspects of the care provided lead to, or fail to resolve, feelings of social isolation.

The Manchester-based Arndale Centre report concludes that, “[t]he general picture is of a wider home care system in which older people are not effectively involved: which they do not understand, and which does not often make the extra effort required to involve them in ways tailored to their state of health and other needs”.

A recurring theme in the responses of those interviewed is the social isolation that their home care is not adequately addressing. One male interviewee in his seventies who previously used a scooter to get about said in his interview, “I haven’t been out of the house now for about four weeks. I daren’t. The last time I went out on the scooter I hit the kerb and it frightened the living daylights out of me.” Another, an 85-year-old woman who lives alone, expressed sadness at her inability to do normal things, “I would love to go to town to do some shopping. I haven’t been to town for about two years… Wander round the town and have a cup of tea… I’d love that.”

The social isolation many elderly experience was summed up neatly by another woman in her eighties in her interview: “When you go now, I will maybe not talk to anybody till tomorrow; maybe the whole of tomorrow nobody to talk [to]… face to face. Nobody will knock on that door, that is it, a life of isolation.”

The EHRC, having commissioned this report in the face of funding changes and reform of the care system, intends to press for legislative changes to ensure those receiving care at home are given the same protections under the Human Rights Act as those in residential care. In the conclusions of their report they offer to work with, and support, local authorities in understanding and delivering care that respects peoples’ rights and dignity; and, recommend better guidance as to the choices available to the elderly, and their families, be made available.

James Brady, former White House press secretary, gun control advocate, dies at 73

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Tuesday, August 5, 2014 

James Brady, former White House Press Secretary for the Ronald Reagan US presidential administration and advocate for gun control, died yesterday at age 73 in an Alexandria, Virginia retirement community. The family released a statement saying, “We are heartbroken to share the news that our beloved Jim ‘Bear’ Brady has passed away after a series of health issues”. Brady was a few weeks shy of his 74th birthday.

Brady was serving as President Reagan’s press secretary when he was the most seriously wounded out of four, in a assassination attempt on Reagan by John Hinckley, Jr. on March 30, 1981. Brady was shot in the head by a hollow-point bullet damaging his right frontal lobe. Dr. Arthur Kobrine, a neurosurgeon, operated on Brady to save his life. Brady survived but was left with brain damage, slurred speech, short-term memory loss, and partial paralysis which required use of a wheelchair.

Following the assassination attempt, Brady and his wife Sarah joined with The Center to Prevent Handgun Violence, and Handgun Control, Inc., two organizations lobbying for gun control. The organizations were later renamed in honor of Brady, as Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence and the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence respectively. The organizations lobbied for the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, a law passed in 1993 which requires federal background checks on firearm purchasers in the United States.

Brady never again held press conferences after the assassination attempt; nevertheless, he officially remained press secretary throughout the entire Reagan administration, till 1989. In 2000, the White House press briefing room was renamed after Brady. Josh Earnest, President Barack Obama’s current press secretary, along with eleven other former White House press secretaries said in a statement, “Jim Brady defined the role of the modern White House Press Secretary. With his passing we lost a friend and mentor, and the country lost a selfless public servant who dedicated his life to service, even in the face of tragedy. […] Jim set the model and standard for the rest of us to follow. It’s been a genuine honor for each of us to stand at the podium in the briefing room that will always bear his name.”